North American Turbocoupe Organization



Scrapping, rubbing noise
Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#1
Howdy y'all, in my 88 tc I get a low pitch scrapping rubbing sound when I'm rolling slowly, it gets especially worse when I turn right and seems to go away when I go left. It doesnt to it all the time. My mechanic says its because of rust on the rear rotors, sound possible? Thanks
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
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Pete D Offline
Administrator
#2
People report that the guide pins for the caliper can freeze up and cause a pad to rub (and wear out) on the rear. It is often an inside pad that wears. Some people remove, clean up and lightly lube the pins as a PM thing yearly. It would make sense that it would most likely occur on cars that sit for long periods, like a car with only 58K on it.
Pete Dunham


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Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#3
I'll have to look into that, if not maybe just new calipers
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
Reply

anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#4
There are rubber/neoprene boots that fit over the threaded bolt ends of the sliding pins on the rear calipers. They look very much like tiny versions of the boots found on front wheel drive transaxles...and, just like them, should a hole or rip develop in those boots that would allow water, etc. to get in, you won't be very happy with the likely result. I've had to drill out one such pin that seized up inside the caliper because apparently I wasn't attentive enough of them and their individual conditions--it was very tedious and nerve-wracking, as I didn't want to ruin the entire caliper.

Somewhere I read to use silicone diaelectric grease on the pins; that's the same clear stuff you put inside your spark plug wire boots when reinstalling to keep them from sticking. I would guess that's because of its noncorrosive effects on rubber or neoprene--maybe one of our experts could chime in on this.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#5
So basically if i.buy nee calipers I'm good to go? I can get those at a local advance right? But I'm gonna take a look at those boots and pins as well
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
Reply

Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#6
Okay realized its not brakes. I had the back end in the air and spun the wheels. It makes the noise when the posi track is functioning but when just one wheel spins solely it doesn't make a sound
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
Reply

anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#7
You're supposed to add a friction modifier (4 oz I think) when you change the rear axle lubricant. However, the synthetic Valvoline gear oil I've been using for a while now already includes it, as I believe do most others. I had some unpleasant noises coming from the axle on cornering, but that's gone away after the most recent lubricant change.

Perhaps this product will help alleviate your noise issue without a teardown.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#8
I'll probably get the friction modifier too for good measure. That'll be getting done Monday and I'll report back
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
Reply

Pete D Offline
Administrator
#9
Something else you might want to consider. In these rear ends the ends of axles at the wheels ride directly in the bearings. This can wear the axles with time and mileage and this will cause some noise. There are two fixes. You can get an offset bearing that rides in a different spot on the axle. The second fix is to get new axle shafts. Some people are satisfied with the offset bearing fix, and others have said it is not a long lasting fix. New axles will cost some money and I haven't looked at prices. Moser Engineering used to be reasonable but look around if you go that route.
Pete Dunham


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Rednecksportscar Offline
Member
#10
Wouldn't it make noise consistently if it was the axles. It's silent if you hold one wheel.and spin the othet
1988 turbo coupe stick shift
Stock stock and more stock, besides for some too quiet magnaflows
Reply





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