North American Turbocoupe Organization



Question for electrical guys
Rob H Offline
Member
#1
Hi guys.
As I've found the EEC code flashing technique to be useful, I decided to follow Jeffs GUIDE to running codes from inside the car. Please check it out using that link, but for those that don't know, you can basically just run two wires from the EEC connector to a switch in your car(87&88).
So I got myself all set up in that regard, I'll attach pictures. Disabled the cigar lighter, drilled a couple holes through the side and installed this toggle switch I picked up at a surplus store. By the way, it was a complete accident that it happened to be a perfect fit. 
I was looking around the interior trying to decide what part of the car I wanted to drill a large hole in. None was my answer, so I was spinning my wheels on that until I spied the never ever used cigar lighter. So if we meet and you need a cigar lit, you're out of luck.
Anyways, this toggle switch is designed for use with 120V. It happens to have a lit led ring around the switch. It comes with an extra attachementchment that steps down
From 120 volts AC to 6 volts DC(specifically for the led ring, it has its own connectors). I already fooled around with it and dc power a bunch and found that as long as I connect the negative power to the spot before the resistor, I get good and proper voltage to the led.
So I got thinking...how cool would it be if the switch not only turned on the KOEO & KOER diagnostic mode, but if it ALSO in addition the the CEL, blinked out the codes on that ring?
You might want to grab a tissue at this point, this tale of hardship is one I may or may not be alone in.
I FIND the CEL a tad inconvenient to watch in the KOEO & KOER mode. Plus I'm right handed, and I more often than not record what happened so I can review later. I have to kind of sit forward slightly, and look through the steering wheel at it Sad
I told you it was a sad story lol
Joking aside, do you guys know of an easily accessible wire i can hijack to make this happen? Obviously the CEL wire is the prime suspect. Is that wire easier to find in the harness somewhere else though and hijack?
As I'm writing this I'm realizing that that would be by far the most logical way to go about it. I just don't want to take everything apart again.
Just looking for thoughts on this.
I did note that their is 4.98 volts available on the wires coming from the EEC to my switch. But that disappears as soon as the tests begin.
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Rob H Offline
Member
#2
Forgot to hit add attachment


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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#3
(07-12-2020, 03:55 AM)Rob H Wrote: Forgot to hit add attachment

Sorry to rain on your proverbial parade, Rob....

OR you could just spend $35 like I did on Amazon for a REAL Code Scanner, and stop counting flashing lights.

NOVA Ford EEC-IV Digital Code Reader.

I’ve been counting CEL flashes since 1991. I got tired of it. No offense meant (really), but it’s time to start swimming in the deep end of the pool. Spend your time on more worthwhile pursuits.

I’m all for saving $$, but there comes a point when it’s just easier to buy what you need.

Just sayin’.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#4
I personally have no issues counting out the flashes on the CEL or an LED on my 88 TC, 86 Tbird 5.0, or 95 Taurus.

For our newer OBDII junk, I use Forscan on my PC. Forscan, which is a free download, along with a $30 ELM327 OBDII interface that can also read the MS CANBUS in addition to the HS CANBUS. Forscan will show hundreds, if not thousands of PIDs, graphs multiple PIDS at the same time on the screen in various formats, and it also allows you to change programming in most modules.

FYI, that is my tech article I wrote probably 18 years ago. Andrews name is just on it since he transferred everything to the new NATO site.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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Rob H Offline
Member
#5
(07-12-2020, 11:58 AM)anasazi4st Wrote:
(07-12-2020, 03:55 AM)Rob H Wrote: Forgot to hit add attachment

Sorry to rain on your proverbial parade, Rob....

OR you could just spend $35 like I did on Amazon for a REAL Code Scanner, and stop counting flashing lights.

NOVA Ford EEC-IV Digital Code Reader.

I’ve been counting CEL flashes since 1991. I got tired of it. No offense meant (really), but it’s time to start swimming in the deep end of the pool. Spend your time on more worthwhile pursuits.

I’m all for saving $$, but there comes a point when it’s just easier to buy what you need.

Just sayin’.

I checked out that link. I'm not really at all concerned about saving $50 or whatever it would cost to get it here. If it is a very handy tool to have I would be interested. I read the description for the item. Does it do more than just eliminate the need to count the flashes? I'm assuming it grabs the trouble codes and let's you review them easily and clear them, but is that it?
I didn't mind counting the flashes really. The only thing that bothered me about it at all was having to jumper then run to get back in the car quickly to make sure I don't miss anything.

Now I don't have to. Thanks Jeff for the article on how to do that, and sorry for not catching that it was your article. Corrected my link above.
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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#6
(07-12-2020, 03:42 PM)Rob H Wrote:
(07-12-2020, 11:58 AM)anasazi4st Wrote:
(07-12-2020, 03:55 AM)Rob H Wrote: Forgot to hit add attachment

Sorry to rain on your proverbial parade, Rob....

OR you could just spend $35 like I did on Amazon for a REAL Code Scanner, and stop counting flashing lights.

NOVA Ford EEC-IV Digital Code Reader.

I’ve been counting CEL flashes since 1991. I got tired of it. No offense meant (really), but it’s time to start swimming in the deep end of the pool. Spend your time on more worthwhile pursuits.

I’m all for saving $$, but there comes a point when it’s just easier to buy what you need.

Just sayin’.

I checked out that link. I'm not really at all concerned about saving $50 or whatever it would cost to get it here. If it is a very handy tool to have I would be interested. I read the description for the item. Does it do more than just eliminate the need to count the flashes? I'm assuming it grabs the trouble codes and let's you review them easily and clear them, but is that it?
I didn't mind counting the flashes really. The only thing that bothered me about it at all was having to jumper then run to get back in the car quickly to make sure I don't miss anything.

Now I don't have to. Thanks Jeff for the article on how to do that, and sorry for not catching that it was your article. Corrected my link above.

Yes it will save whatever codes it receives. It works very well. I fashioned a sort of extension cord for it and connected that to the test connectors, so I have the Code Reader in the car with me whilst I do the tests.

Sorry guys, but I have to disagree. This is 2020. Counting CEL flashes is soooo last century. We have better, less expensive tools now. In 1991–months after I got my TC—I bought a EEC-IV code scanner for $180. I did not know how to jumper the wires and read the CEL flashes, and I am embarrassed to admit it, but when I was done getting the codes I took that thing right back for a refund. At that point in my life spending that kind of $$ for a tool I would rarely use seemed extravagant. Nowadays though I have all kinds of ABS testing equipment and other tools I bought that I might never use, just in case I ever need them.

I do like Jeff’s idea of using a computer and software to read the output, though.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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JT Offline
Posting Freak
#7
I haven't read codes on my '87 TC in some 10 years. Turn key on check engine light comes on, engine starts, check engine light goes out and car runs as expected for a 33 year old car. These systems were fairly crude and don't tell you a whole lot until something is broken.

Unlike the "OBDII junk", as Jeff refers to, is very different where so many little things can trip a check engine light on that are minor due to increasing strict regulations. That said, the OBDII stuff comes with a wealth of diagnostic capabilities. Being able to view long and short term fuel trims, as just an example, gives a lot of insight you don't get on these cars as it's not supported.

The system on these cars don't support live data or really bi-directional controls. So no fancy scanner will do much more than a blinking check engine light. But it does make it more convenient and brings it up toward 1990s level than 1980s.
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#8
I am a BIG fan of OBDII....... sooooo much info available that in most cases in makes troubleshooting a breeze IF you understand what the codes are telling you. One of many many examples I have seen on other later model auto sites I frequent: Someone posts they have a P0171 and / or P0174 Which are bank 1 (171) or bank 2 (174) O2 sensors reading lean. The person replaces the O2 sensor or sensors because some moron at the local parts store told them to, and finds the code(s) still there. I have to explain to them that 171/174 is/are telling you the LTFT(s) are over +20% or so due to vacuum leaks (98% of the time), or low fuel pressure (2% of the time), and that the O2 sensors are not the problem. I could go on and on with similar examples.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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84TBirdTurbo42 Offline
Senior Member
#9
the only thing i dont love about obd 2 anymore, especially with this late model stuff, is the need to multiplex modules to roll windows down. and then have a pu20 codes and just extra unneccesary garbage. however, thats kind of a different subject for a different thread. lol. that being said, especially now a days. our fuel injection is really rather simple compared to todays stuff. an on/off EGO (o2) sensor. and only a few inputs.
Chris Perry
1984 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe. Dead, NY rot killed her
1986 Thunderbird shell, swapping parts from the 84.
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