North American Turbocoupe Organization



Injector Removal
Rob H Offline
Member
#1
Hey guys I'm at my trailer. I have really awful internet, I'm not near my car to look and also don't have my manuals as they are at home. Did a bit of a look around on here with the slow internet didn't see anything.
I found a guy a couple hundred kilometres away that Flo's Jets and cleans them. Figured while I'm waiting for my part to show up next week and I've got the upper intake off it would be a great opportunity to take those to him. It's a huge pain in the butt, going to take a couple hours to drive there and a couple back. Normally people leave them with him for a couple days. But given the situation he said if I bring them to him next Tuesday at around 6 p.m. he can easily get them done in a couple hours so by 9 for sure I be able to pick them up and get home.
He would like me to confirm that I can come ASAP.
My question is this, is removing the Jets hard? I will be going home Sunday or Monday, if I know I can get them off easily enough then I can give him lots of notice that I'm coming Tuesday.
Thanks in advance
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JT Offline
Posting Freak
#2
Removing the fuel injectors is very easy. Once the upper intake manifold is off, there's just two bolts that hold down the fuel rail. Remove those and there will be enough room for you to pull the fuel rail up enough to allow removing the fuel injectors. You may need need to remove the vacuum hose to the the fuel pressure regulator on the rail. You'll need a fine flat blade screw driver or fine pick to release the tabs on the injector connectors. With old age and cold/hot cycles, you may end up snapping some tabs as they're plastic.

Although good gas should help clean and keep injectors clean, if they've sat for a while or are original then it does benefit to have them cleaned and flow checked to compare them against each other. Since these injectors are not sequential injectors fired individually, it's better that they all flow close to the same.
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Rob H Offline
Member
#3
Alright sounds easy enough, sounds like I'm good to go. Thanks JT
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Rob H Offline
Member
#4
Another question. Is there a reason why someone would perform this service rather than just getting new ones?
Asking as I believe this guy charges $30 a piece. He asked for a picture of one of them. While trying to find a pic online I noticed they aren't really expensive(was looking at rock auto). And of course, they are new. And I wouldn't have to drive hours to get them
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JT Offline
Posting Freak
#5
Injectors that are cleaned and flowed have the benefit of knowing (if) the injectors flow similar to each other. Some companies that do this service will trade out injectors from their own supply so the customer has a set that flows closest to each other. On older systems this can help the A/F ratio and idle. On our system the injectors are fired together. Of course injectors are made up of electrical and mechanical components and they can wear. New parts, especially aftermarket, are not always better. I would be hesitant on cheap injectors. They have an important function.
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#6
^^^^ Agree 100% with JT.

Good chance cheapo made in a cave in the third world injectors may not flow correctly and may not last long before they start to leak. Quality injectors require VERY precise machining and have VERY close internal tolerances.

Get your current OEM injectors cleaned and flow tested. You will be better off in the long run.

Can't you mail your injectors to the person / company and have them mail them back to you?
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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Rob H Offline
Member
#7
I definitely can, and I'm starting to think I might if feasible. Knowing Canada Post I wouldn't be surprised if it was $30 each way.
I'm going to do it one way or another, but I'm missing my car, been the better part of a month since I last drove it. And now the part is waiting for me at home already. If I drove them there and back I'd have the car back together sooner.
Somehow the part I ordered from Rock Auto shipped Thursday and was here Friday mid afternoon. All the way here from Baltimore!
He does this from his home so not sure if he is big enough to have injectors to swap out.
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vegas_ss Offline
Senior Member
#8
I wouldn't hesitate to put in a set of the FJ20's from rockauto @ $33.70/ea.  They are new, produced by standard motor products and are for the large vam 85-88 turbo coupe.  You can then get yours cleaned and flow tested for a backup and if you have issues with the replacements, send them back.  I have always found standard motor products parts as good as the original and in some case, better.

FJ20
1987 TC, 5sp, Boport Stage 3 Head/2.1 Cam
1996 Impala SS
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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#9
(08-08-2020, 07:23 PM)Rob H Wrote: I definitely can, and I'm starting to think I might if feasible. Knowing Canada Post I wouldn't be surprised if it was $30 each way.
I'm going to do it one way or another, but I'm missing my car, been the better part of a month since I last drove it. And now the part is waiting for me at home already. If I drove them there and back I'd have the car back together sooner.
Somehow the part I ordered from Rock Auto shipped Thursday and was here Friday mid afternoon. All the way here from Baltimore!
He does this from his home so not sure if he is big enough to have injectors to swap out.

I’ve said this before: unless I am fairly certain—after consulting the manuals and looking online, for example—that I can do something well enough myself, I would rarely if ever have someone do it for me.

I would go with vegas_ss’s suggestion and get new ones, and install them. If you recall, I already described to you how to remove and clean the old ones yourself. Regardless of what you decide, I would NOT drive two hours there and back if you can ship them! It would be a good idea to have them professionally cleaned and flow tested if you are going to keep them as spares.

I have newer injectors on my TC, and I have several of the OEM brown top ones as spares, probably at least two sets each (4 per set). Yes, the color top is important with the OEM ones as it determines the amount of force and fuel each meters out. Newer ones generally don’t have the plastic spacer or pintle cap (plastic “hat”) that the OEM ones do, just the two neoprene o-rings, one each at top and bottom. OH—and don’t use grease to lubricate those o-rings on reinstall, it will clog the injectors! Use light weight oil.

25-30 years ago I was much like you, constantly tinkering with my car. I have boxes of parts that are still good but I replaced because the manuals said to, after so many miles. Nowadays instead I try and limit my wrench-turning to actual improvement work.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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