North American Turbocoupe Organization



Getting to know your TC: The Clutch Replacement
Mr.T Offline
Senior Member
#1
Well guys, I've got three big postings planned that hopefully will provide a little more insite on some of the areas of the TC that there are always questions on, myths revolving around or are just plain interesting. The first is regarding doing a full clutch replacement on an '86 TC.

Now clutch replacements have been covered in detail all over the place and the Ford shop manual does a very good job explaining the steps. The goal here is to try and provide the critical part info for some of the items that are getting hard to find or are not always remembered during replacement. Additionally, I tried to list some brief tips to make the job easier.

My situation was interesting. The clutch on my daily driver '86 was almost completely gone and pedal efforts were through the roof. Clutch had to be pressed ALL the way to the floor to even consider shifting. The car has 171,000 on it. I bought it at 150,000, and luckily the original owner had kept EVERY record. Research showed that the car had two complete clutch replacemnts including flywheel resurfacing in the last 60,000 miles! Obviously something was up as the car was totally bone stock so over-powering was not the issue.

Teardown revealed the reasons for the infantile mortality of the parts. The bearing retainer was scored and the throwout bearing was obviously having a difficult time sliding. The bell crank on the side of the bellhousing was very difficult to move and the inner bearings and grease were toast. The input bearing grease was hard as a rock, and the clutch fork tangs that hold the throwout bearing were almost completetly worn through!

Clutch slippage had become so bad thet the flywheel had a perfect mirror finish. To top it off, the rear main and valve cover gasket were leaking oil into the bellhousing. the fact that the car could even do 80 MPH still baffles me.

Basically the clutch was not engaging fully or able to disengage fully at certain times resulting in very fast clutch wear.

I decided it was time to give the 'Bird some serious TLC. Below are the parts I used to perform the repair:

Clutch Parts
Part: Flywheel (All New)
Part #: 50-703
Cost: $49.98
Purchased: Advance Auto Parts
Supplier: Perfection Clutch
Notes: Made in China. (Same part is sold at both NAPA and Advance Auto). Only normal auto parts stores I could find that could get me a new flywheel.


Part: Clutch Kit (All New: Disc, Pressure Plate, T/Out Bearing, Input Bearing, Alignment Tool)
Part #: 07-038
Cost: $105.00 ($120.00 w/ shipping)
Purchased: Internet - Carolina Clutch www.carolinaclutch.com
Supplier: Valeo
Notes: Well packaged OEM kit; also used for ’87-’88. Has higher torque capacity than original ’83-’86 clutch.


Part: Clutch Fork (All New)
Part #: E3ZZ-7515-A
Cost: $56.47 ($66.42 w/ shipping) (Ford List: $72.40, Ford Discounted: $54.30)
Purchased: Ford Motor Co. (Howard Parts Distribution Center in Oklahoma)
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: OEM service part. Identical (including stamped part #) to the original out of my ’86. Same exact part used on '83-'86 T-Bird/Cougar, '83-'86 Mustang/Capri and '87-'93 Mustang w/ 4-Cylinder engine.

Part: Clutch Fork Pivot Ball (All New)
Part #: D5FZ-7B602-A
Cost: Free (Ford List: $17.57, Ford Discounted: $13.18)
Purchased: Given to me.
Supplier: Tremec Transmissions?
Notes: Same as is currently used on the 2004 (and probably ’94-’03) T-5 in V6 Mustangs.


Part: Input Bearing Retainer - Steel (All New)
Part #: HMS527004
Cost: $39.95
Purchased: Hanlon Motorsports
Supplier: Tremec Transmissions
Notes: Cheapest price I could find. Way cheaper than Ford’s price. Thicker collar than original part.


Part: Input Bearing Retainer Seal (All New)
Part #: 12363
Cost: $4.90
Purchased: Hanlon Motorsports
Supplier: Tremec Transmissions
Notes: Good idea to install a new one if you are replacing the bearing retainer.


Part: Clutch Cable - 2” Dog-Bone (All New)
Part #: E6ZZ-7535-A
Cost: ??? Don’t remember. Had it lying around.
Purchased: Ford Motor Co.
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: Cheap insurance to replace. Ford slightly updated this part from its original design in 1986. Same exact part used on '83-'86 T-Bird/Cougar, '83-'86 Mustang/Capri and '87-'93 Mustang w/ 4-Cylinder engine.


Part: Bell Crank (Good Used)
Part #: E3ZZ-7N628-A
Cost: Internet trade for fasteners
Purchased: Internet
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: Impossible to find new. I did a nationwide search of dealerships and found zero. There may be a later application that will work but I am still researching. Possibly late model 2.3L N/A Mustangs.

Part: Clevis Clip – Clutch Cable (Good Used)
Part #: D5FZ-2861-A
Cost: Internet trade for fasteners
Purchased: Internet
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: One of mine was ovaled out from years of use. Still available from Ford. Common part also used for parking brake cable applications.

Driveline Parts
Part: Driveshaft U-Joints (All New)
Part #: ???
Cost: $12.99/Part
Purchased: Pep Boys
Supplier: Brute Force
Notes: Non-Greaseable, Heavy Duty packed w/ Synthetic Grease


Seal parts
Part: Valve Cover Gasket - Rubber (All New)
Part #: F57Z-6584-A
Cost: $23.90 (Ford List: $31.86)
Purchased: Ford Motor Co.
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: The good one. Rubber w/ steel core, torque limiters and double sealing lip.


Part: Rear Main Oil Seal (All New)
Part #: E5ZZ-6701-A
Cost: $16.63 (Ford List: $22.17)
Purchased: Ford Motor Co.
Supplier: Ford Motor Co. sourced supplier
Notes: I screwed up here. Apparently the later revised design for the 5.0L works for us and is an upgraded part. It has a double lip for improved sealing.

Good Tools to Have
Part: Flywheel Holder/Turner
Part #: P-32520
Cost: $5.99
Purchased: Harbor Freight
Supplier:
Notes: Super easy to use. Worth every penny.

Clutch Parts Total Cost: $256.30
Driveline Parts Total Cost: $25.98
Seals Total Cost: $40.53
GRAND TOTAL: $322.81 (Shipping and tax not included)


Extra Notes
·Get the new rear main seal designed for the 5.0L!!!! Improved double lip design.
·Don’t forget flywheel dowels!!!! If your flywheel has already been machined once before, the original machinist may have just machined them flat instead of removing them. No auto part stores had them (I checked five). I finally got them at a very old clutch shop in my city. He had exactly three. Not sure if Ford still carries them.
·Remember to have trans fluid around in case you spill some. Good idea just to replace it anyway.
·Remember to remove the shims from your old input bearing retainer and replace them in the same orientation in your new retainer.
·Have LOTS of brake cleaner and rags available to clean stuff.
·Contrary to some reports, a slide hammer w/ claw attachments works well for removing the input bearing. Just make sure it is seated well before pulling back on the hammer.
·Lift up on the alignment tool while torqueing down the pressure plate. This will help later when you are sliding in the trans as you are much more likely to slide the clutch disc down slightly from the weight of the trans than you are to push it upwards.
·It was impossible for me to get the trans off the bellhousing during removal, but I did seperate them and then install the bellhousing separately. Much easier to align trans.


Many thanks to my friend Matt and his Dad for letting me use their shop(Permatech of Detroit) while doing the job. It took a while to track down parts.

Next up: Operation, common faults and repair of the clutch pedal arm and quadrant. Why this part has a drastic effect on clutch travel and reserve, and why it gets a bad rap. Also, explanation of how to measure pedal travel, first roll and clutch reserve and why they are important.

Plus: Before and after Dyno comparison and full temperature data in four critical zones following the installation of a '87-'88 Intercooler on a stock '85 T-Bird. Unbelievable results from just an IC install. Stay tuned!

------------------
1985 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project)
1985 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project II)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Show Car)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Silver (The Daily Driver)
1989 Mustang GT, 5Spd, Black

[This message has been edited by Mr.T (edited 02-10-2004).]

[This message has been edited by Mr.T (edited 02-15-2004).]
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project Car)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Show Car)
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tps87turbo Offline
Posting Freak
#2
Very Nice Write-up & details.

------------------
Tony Sceia
Red 88 TC loaded with every option, Walbro 255, 3" SS Downpipe with Magnaflow SS 2.5 Cat Back Mustang Dual system Installed by BJL, 3-core Radiator, Star Stage 2 Clutch, Rebuilt T-5 Tranny, 140 MPH Speedo

Now I need to finish converting to Raven/Gray Leather interior & just do some Body work & she'll be like new.
Tony Sceia -

HIS Red 88 TC
http://turbotbird.com/showroom/data_r-z/...a_88tc.php
HERS - Blue 87 TC, fully loaded with every option, Work in Progress
87 Gray TC Parts Car - Gave to BJL and is now his daily driver
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#3
Quote:Originally posted by tps87turbo:
Very Nice Write-up & details.


I agree.... should this be put in the tech articles or FAQ sections?

------------------
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 21 psi, forced air intercooler, water injection, bypass valve, Ranger roller cam, subframes, etc., etc.. // 86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP nitrous, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.... // 91 Escort: Bone stock winter car // 02 Taurus Vulcan(wifes car)
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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Pete D Offline
Administrator
#4
Mr. T, an excellent write up.
I not sure where to put it but we will put it somewhere. I think the list of part numbers will go in the Part Number Forum and then we put the whole article in the Tech Articles when Nate Can get to it.

I know there must be differences in the 83-86 and the 87-88 clutch forks but I have gotten several 87-88 clutch forks, from Ford for like $11-12 each. I haven't seen an 83-86 fork but I just can't believe there is actually $42 worth of difference.
Pete Dunham


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jabobia Offline
Member
#5
[staying tuned]

[Image: biggrin.gif]

-james
87 Thunderbird TurboCoupe - 2.3T, T5, 3.55L - K&N, 18psi - [email protected](2.37 60')
88 Thunderbird Sport - 5.0SO, AOD, 2.73L - [email protected](2.39 60')
www.cardomain.com/id/jabobia
jabobia.com
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Mr.T Offline
Senior Member
#6
Thanks for the comments.

Pete,
There is a difference, but definitely not $40+ worth [Image: frown.gif]. I am looking in to whether or not a N/A 2.3L Mustang Fork will work for our application. I may edit my write up and add the missing part #'s in the next couple days. I will also try to post pictures of the destroyed parts if you think it is valuable.

------------------
1985 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project)
1985 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project II)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Show Car)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Silver (The Daily Driver)
1989 Mustang GT, 5Spd, Black
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project Car)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Show Car)
Reply

Pete D Offline
Administrator
#7
Mr.T

I already put the part numbers part of your write up in the PN forum. So if you get updated info/pns, please change the info there also or tell me to do it. I also put in a Part # for the dog bone cable based on a couple I bought recently for my SVO. I'm not absolutely sure they are the same as the TC dog bones, so if anybody knows for sure, please let me know and I will make changes accordingly. I didn't list a price although I think?? I paid around $15-16 ea.

[This message has been edited by Pete D (edited 02-10-2004).]
Pete Dunham


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mark murphy Offline
Member
#8
Mr.T
I just did a T-5 swap on an 88 TC and used parts from an 86 TC with the cable clutch. I'm trying to figure out how I would replace the dog-bone cable with something that could be adjusted. My clutch simply doesn't disengage enough.I've even tried fooling with the quadrent to get more travel out of the pedal but it doesn't last long and goes back to where you just have to really push hard on the pedal. Sometimes I can't get into reverse and have to go back up into a forward gear to clear out the box if you know what I'm trying to describe. You sound like you have alot of experience with the setup I'm using and could use any insight you may have concerning clutch adjustment options.

------------------
Mark Murphy/88 TC, silver
loaded,t-5 swap, K&N filter,Gillis boost valve, bypass valve
Walbro 255 FP, Kirbin FPR
3" downpipe, 2-1/2" duals
w/Dynomax turbo mufflers
88 TC silver, 11/05 complete engine rebuild including head work, stainless valves, upper/lower intakes machined by Pete D. Added T-3 60/63 using Bob Lee 3 Gen. header, 3"downpipe no cat, 2-1/2" duals, adj FP Reg. Walbro 255 FP, cold air intake,Gillis boost valve, bypass valve, 3 row radiator, 17 x 9 Cobra R Wheels
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Mr.T Offline
Senior Member
#9
Mark,

I'm assuming that you used ALL of the parts from the '86:

Clutch pedal, clutch quadrant and shaft, clutch cable, bellhousing and bell-crank mechanism, dog-bone cable, clutch fork.

If you tried to use any of the parts from your '88, or if you used any Mustang parts, you may be in trouble.

Now, first off, it is very common to have to put the trans in to first gear before going in to reverse. Reverse is not a synchronized gear, and at one time Ford even put a tag in Mustangs on the shifter to describe this exact operation.

Next, If you installed used parts (especially the cables) they may have stretched over time and will have a tendency to stretch a little more than a new part during the actual depression of the clutch pedal. Also, as the quadrant ages and is cycled (upwards of 1.5 million times in the life of a high mileage car) the spring that operates the quadrant and "pulls" slack out of the cable begins to lose some force.

All this (plus some other stuff) can lead to one not being able to disengage the clutch completely. I will go in to this all in much better detail including pics when I do the write up on the quadrant assembly. Worn out and used parts may be the culprit.
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Project Car)
1986 T-bird TC, 5Spd, Black (The Show Car)
Reply

mark murphy Offline
Member
#10
you are correct, all parts were from an 86.
I'm sort of wishing now I had stuck with the hydraulic clutch but those have there problems too. I'm determined to engineer some sort of manual adjustment off the clutch fork that would allow for the wear in the cables etc. I don't see why it wasn't designed that way to begin with.
88 TC silver, 11/05 complete engine rebuild including head work, stainless valves, upper/lower intakes machined by Pete D. Added T-3 60/63 using Bob Lee 3 Gen. header, 3"downpipe no cat, 2-1/2" duals, adj FP Reg. Walbro 255 FP, cold air intake,Gillis boost valve, bypass valve, 3 row radiator, 17 x 9 Cobra R Wheels
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