North American Turbocoupe Organization



Draining coolant
Rob H Offline
Member
#11
I hate taking shortcuts. In a couple years I'll do it the better way.
I feel like what I did was way better than nothing. I learned there was likely air in the system, and that unfortunately maybe had been that way for some time. I replaced the radiator cap also just in case.
Something I didn't mention that I also found was that the line from the fill neck on the rad to the reservoir was somewhat broken.
The line never came off on its own, surprisingly. But the plastic piece on the reservoir is snapped off, with the broken off piece still in the end of the hose and held by a clamp. It still when placed in position seemed to stay there, but I don't know how air tight that connection needs to be. I cut the hose off before that broken piece, and there was enough plastic there to still reattach the hose to and it grips well.
I was talking to a guy at the store where I usually get my parts, and mentioned about the car running hot. He knows I only drive it in the summer, he asked about using a lower temp thermostat.
Basically said when they make cars they assume you will drive them year round. Suggested maybe I could try a lower temp(180) thermostat.
I did say "well a lot of the guys who have these cars are in the states, some in real hot climates".
Just a suggestion he said. Obviously not better than finding a problem if there is one.
I know nothing about the implications of that suggestion. Any thoughts on that?
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#12
Thermostat just controls the MINIMUM coolant temp, and has nothing to do with the maximum temp. A lower temp tstat will do nothing to reduce coverheating in any way, shape, or form. Stick with the stork 192 deg F thermostat. Lower temp tstats slightly reduce MPG, and can reduce oil life as oil may not get hot enough to "boil off" contaminants in the oil. You cant go wrong with the stock Motorcraft tstat. Stay away from the "failsafe" tstats. They tend to fail in the closed position causing serious overheating.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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Rob H Offline
Member
#13
Ok thanks Jeff
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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#14
(05-22-2020, 02:06 AM)Rob H Wrote: I hate taking shortcuts. In a couple years I'll do it the better way.
I feel like what I did was way better than nothing. I learned there was likely air in the system, and that unfortunately maybe had been that way for some time. I replaced the radiator cap also just in case.
Something I didn't mention that I also found was that the line from the fill neck on the rad to the reservoir was somewhat broken.
The line never came off on its own, surprisingly. But the plastic piece on the reservoir is snapped off, with the broken off piece still in the end of the hose and held by a clamp. It still when placed in position seemed to stay there, but I don't know how air tight that connection needs to be. I cut the hose off before that broken piece, and there was enough plastic there to still reattach the hose to and it grips well.
I was talking to a guy at the store where I usually get my parts, and mentioned about the car running hot. He knows I only drive it in the summer, he asked about using a lower temp thermostat.
Basically said when they make cars they assume you will drive them year round. Suggested maybe I could try a lower temp(180) thermostat.
I did say "well a lot of the guys who have these cars are in the states, some in real hot climates".
Just a suggestion he said. Obviously not better than finding a problem if there is one.
I know nothing about the implications of that suggestion. Any thoughts on that?

Walter C. Avrea. He made a fortune, I would bet, on a simple patent that led to the coolant expansion/overflow tank.

From the shop manual: “Walter C. Avrea, the owner of patents 3, 601, 181 and RE 27, 965, has granted Ford Motor Company rights with respect to cooling systems covered by these patents."

It was genius, and any of us could have figured it out. He determined that, in a sealed system, liquid tends to expand when hot and contract when cold. He applied this to the automotive cooling system—creating the overflow tank—which serves three functions: it gives coolant that has expanded beyond its working boundaries a place to go, instead of on the ground underneath the vehicle—and when cool, allows its return to the radiator; it also provides the vehicle owner/mechanic a safe place to add coolant when necessary, instead of opening the radiator cap and exposing oneself to hot steam and overheated coolant; and last, it shows the level of coolant in the system.

I bring this up because in order for it to work properly, the system must be closed with no air leaks. The overflow tube from the radiator filler neck to the overflow tank must be in good condition and free from kinks and leaks, or the vacuum created when the coolant loses heat will escape and the excess coolant won’t be pulled back into the radiator. A leak anywhere else would cause the same effect...but nearly anywhere else, there would also be a resultant coolant leak with most likely steam and that pleasant (!!) coolant odor, which would be easy to figure out.

I had this happen to me last year. I could not figure out why the overflow tank was full but the radiator was not. An inspection of the overflow tube revealed a hole that had chafed from contact whilst working on the nearby battery. Once that was fixed, Mr. Avrea’s invention could work as intended.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Rob H Offline
Member
#15
Very interesting history lesson. The best ideas are often the simplest.

When I discovered that break I thought it was likely quite important that it be airtight. Changing the lower radiator hose was the primary reason this all started. In the end that hose which was definitely on its last legs got changed, a half decent flush got done, and two things I wouldn't have found out had I not started anything were found, the false coolant level reading as a result of air in the system and the broken reservoir hose.
And with the new radiator cap to top things off, other than a few hoses that should also get changed, my cooling system should be in good shape for some time to come.
Thanks for the input guys on what I assume to most of you is a rather humdrum procedure!
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#16
I bought a new stock overflow bottle quite a number of years ago from one of the online Mustang supply vendors. Unfortunately I dont remember which one. It wasnt cheap (I seem to remember it was about $80). No clue if they re still available or not.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
Reply

anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#17
(05-23-2020, 03:31 AM)Rob H Wrote: Very interesting history lesson. The best ideas are often the simplest.

When I discovered that break I thought it was likely quite important that it be airtight. Changing the lower radiator hose was the primary reason this all started. In the end that hose which was definitely on its last legs got changed, a half decent flush got done, and two things I wouldn't have found out had I not started anything were found, the false coolant level reading as a result of air in the system and the broken reservoir hose.
And with the new radiator cap to top things off, other than a few hoses that should also get changed, my cooling system should be in good shape for some time to come.
Thanks for the input guys on what I assume to most of you is a rather humdrum procedure!

It actually should NOT be humdrum. After the oil circulating system, the cooling system is the next important (some would argue they are BOTH as vital).

You literally will not get very far with a clogged, stuck or dirty coolant system—eventually it will catch up with you.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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