North American Turbocoupe Organization



Coolant leaking onto hot manifold
Coupedaddy Offline
Member
#1
    I've had this TC since the 90's but I'm still a novice and reluctant to tackle some "issues" without guidance from the experts.  Car has been sitting silent for the last year or so (ABS problems - now fixed) and while driving last weekend, I noticed steam from under the hood once the engine heated up.  Popped the hood and noticed coolant dripping onto the exhaust manifold from one of the 2 metal tubes coming from the water pump leading along the valve cover (see photo).  The drip has now graduated to a full-fledged squirting leak ........ even when the engine is still cool.  The leak seems to be at the metal clip that holds both tubes bolted to the head.  Seems unusual for a metal tube to spring a leak like that.  Has anyone else ever experienced this?  Is there a way to bypass the bad spot possibly with hose.  Is the tubing difficult to replace (goes around the back of the engine then down to who the hell knows where)?
Cupddy
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#2
The coolant lines are steel and do corrode, often from the inside out, especially if regular coolant changes are neglected. New lines are not available. The lines can be removed with some difficulty if you are good at contorting your arms at weird angles and it helps to have small hands. If there is only one bad spot and the rest of the tubes are in good shape, the tube can be removed and the hole could be welded or brazed shut. If the tubes are in bad shape in multiple locations you might be able to find lines in better condition on Ebay, or post in the wanted forums here and over at TF. There was a former NATO member who made his own lines out of copper plumbing pipe and copper fittings. Several years ago I picked up a complete set of lines in good condition at Carlisle for around $20 to throw in my stock of unobtanium TC parts.

For a quick somewhat temporary fix assuming the leak is on a straight section of the tube, take a short (1.5" or so) piece of 5/8" heater hose, slit it along its length, slip it over the tube at the leak with the split in the heater hose opposite the leak, and tighten it down with a worm drive hose clamp with the hose clamp directly over the leak. Might hold for a day, a week, or several years.

I have also patched metal pipes in low pressure applications by wire brushing the leak area so it is down to clean shiny metal, cutting a patch out of sheet steel and bending it to fit the curve of the pipe, generously applying JB Weld, putting the patch over the leak in the pipe, and securing the patch to the pipe with a hose clamp. If attempting this be sure all surfaces are CLEAN and roughed up. I have had repairs like this hold for many years in LOW PRESSURE (under 20 psi) applications.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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Coupedaddy Offline
Member
#3
(11-05-2020, 01:28 AM)Jeff K Wrote: The coolant lines are steel and do corrode, often from the inside out, especially if regular coolant changes are neglected.  New lines are not available. The lines can be removed with some difficulty if you are good at contorting your arms at weird angles and it helps to have small hands. If there is only one bad spot and the rest of the tubes are in good shape, the tube can be removed and the hole could be welded or brazed shut. If the tubes are in bad shape in multiple locations you might be able to find lines in better condition on Ebay, or post in the wanted forums here and over at TF.  There was a former NATO member who made his own lines out of copper plumbing pipe and copper fittings. Several years ago I picked up a complete set of lines in good condition at Carlisle for around $20 to throw in my stock of unobtanium TC parts.

For a quick somewhat temporary fix assuming the leak is on a straight section of the tube, take a short (1.5" or so) piece of 5/8" heater hose, slit it along its length, slip it over the tube at the leak with the split in the heater hose opposite the leak, and tighten it down with a worm drive hose clamp with the hose clamp directly over the leak. Might hold for a day, a week, or several years. 

I have also patched metal pipes in low pressure applications by wire brushing the leak area so it is down to clean shiny metal, cutting a patch out of sheet steel and bending it to fit the curve of the pipe, generously applying JB Weld, putting the patch over the leak in the pipe, and securing the patch to the pipe with a hose clamp. If attempting this be sure all surfaces are CLEAN and roughed up.  I have had repairs like this hold for many years in LOW PRESSURE (under 20 psi) applications.

Thanks Jeff, huge help!  If I'm searching for those steel coolant lines online, what exactly are the part names for both of those lines?  I'll have to pull the IC off to find out which line has sprung a leak.  Where are those lines going?
Cupddy
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andrewjs18 Offline
Administrator
#4
mine are leaking some too, though not as bad as yours.

we're working to try to replicate these in stainless steel tubing...hope to hear something soon on them!
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Coupedaddy Offline
Member
#5
(11-09-2020, 05:23 AM)andrewjs18 Wrote: mine are leaking some too, though not as bad as yours.

we're working to try to replicate these in stainless steel tubing...hope to hear something soon on them!

Thats great news!  I'm considering Jeff's temporary fix suggestions but I'm thinking if those lines are corroding, they'll probably spring leaks someplace else under pressure ................... probably leave me "Found On Road Dead" :-)) sooner or later.  I'll wait a while to hear what develops.  Are they called "stainless steel coolant lines"?
Cupddy
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andrewjs18 Offline
Administrator
#6
(11-09-2020, 12:39 PM)Coupedaddy Wrote:
(11-09-2020, 05:23 AM)andrewjs18 Wrote: mine are leaking some too, though not as bad as yours.

we're working to try to replicate these in stainless steel tubing...hope to hear something soon on them!

Thats great news!  I'm considering Jeff's temporary fix suggestions but I'm thinking if those lines are corroding, they'll probably spring leaks someplace else under pressure ................... probably leave me "Found On Road Dead" :-)) sooner or later.  I'll wait a while to hear what develops.  Are they called "stainless steel coolant lines"?

yeah, there's 3 different coolant lines that we're looking to produce in stainless steel. they'll be expensive. we may also offer new hoses and clamps with them too for an additional cost..maybe...

forced 4 used to sell them but they haven't been around in years.
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