North American Turbocoupe Organization



Connecting electrial wires
Forcedbird Offline
Member
#1
Ok guys I might get flamed for this but I don't know how to connect electrial wires the "RIGHT WAY". I have been connecting them using this:

http://multimedia.mmm.com/mws/mediawebse...WxJc7rrrrQ-

The ones that I have been using are located at the bottom of the picture.

I've heard that the right way to connect electrical wires is to solder the wires together and heat shrink them. I have never soldered anything in my life but I want to learn.

Are the electrical connectors that I've been using OK?

What is the proper way of connecting a bigger gauge wire to a smaller one? (Like connecting an autometer AFR gauge wire to the O2 sensor wire)? I myself just connected the two. Bad? Good?

Could someone refer me to a website or book on how to solder?

I guessed I should have asked this question before I even started connecting electrical wires but hey better late than never.

Jeff, I know that you are very knowledgeable in this area, it would be great if you could chime in.

Thanks,
-Kashain
88 TC

HY 35, Ported Oval head w/OS valves, EEC Tuner, Bob's MOAL, .510 lift cam, Tial 38mm wastegate, K&N in fender, Kirban AFPR, Walbro 255lph fuel pump, 57 lb inj., GN intercooler, Gillis valve, Race eng. adjustable cam pulley, HKS SSQV BOV, Steeda Tri-ax shifter, 4" DP to 2 1/2" exhaust, no muffers, Timing set to 12* BTDC, 26 psi of boost. Needs to get tuned!

Proud to be a NATO member!
Reply

Sqrlcage Offline
Senior Member
#2
At least you know enough to ask!

The fact that you know your limitations will help you get to the next level.

Wire connection/selection/soldering is best learned from an experienced person who can show you how and then give you direct feedback on your skills.

If you don't know someone sho can teach you, then I would recommend a local trade school or commie college and look for basic electronics or even better, auto electronics...mechanical wiring techniques are not the same as residential wiring.

You could probably teach yourself from the internet or a book, but you would miss out on feedback and practical demonstration from an experienced tech.

Sometimes "there is more than one way to skin a cat". The connectors you are using are one way to get the job done, but they are not the best for limited space or even cosmetics. Also repair work is different than initial installation. You are right to seek out more "tools for your toolbox"...

Also, safety is a concern. Working with electrical circuits can be dangerous and costly if mistakes are made...
Sustineo alas, 1988, manual trans
Reply

Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#3
I dont like those type of connectors, especially for use under the hood where they are exposed to the elements. they are a failure waiting to happen. There is no replacement for a good solder joint.

Get a soldering gun that has 100 to 140 Watts power... a 40 Watt pencil type soldering iron wont cut it. Also get some thin electrical solder. Both can be had from Radio Shack and most hardware stores.

First use, the tip of the gun must be "tinned". As soon as it gets hot, maybe 5 sec after pulling the trigger, touch the solder to it and coat the whole tip. When the tip stops looking silvery after use, just heat it up and wipe it off with a rag. Always be sure the tip is clean.

Strip the ends from 2 wires and wind them together tightly. Be sure the wires arent oxidized. If they are, chean them up with fine sandpaper (often happens on old wiring). Preheat the gun until the tip is hot, and make contact with the wires. Allow the wires to heat up. Heat the wires up until the solder starts to flow onto the wires. You never want to use the tip to ment the solder onto the wires, you want to use the tip to heat the wires, and melt the solder onto the wires. A good solder joint looks smooth and bright silver color, not rough, "pointy" and dull colored.

You are a smart guy, Kashain, and I am sure with an hour or so of practicing soldering scrap wires together, you will be soldering loke a pro!
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
Reply

Hurff Offline
Senior Member
#4
The type of connectors you have shown are ... at best a very temporary connection. The are very prone to corrosion and if vibrated have a really nasty way of chewing thru the very wires they are supposed to be connecting. (While leaving the insulating jacket to hold the wires in the connector, so you think it is ok, but in reality it is not....)

That said, yeah I have used them also. Radioshack used to carry a kit for learning how to solder. Really it is not terribly hard, I would recommend getting (and understanding the limitations of) a butane soldering iron. I have a portasol, but there are a number of others out there. The butane iron lets you get just about anywhere to solder, and doenst require a cord.

Now for the limitations, they have a flame, and therefore should never be used around any source of fuel (gas lines) or in a possible flamable atmosphere. They also have an exhaust port which gets quite hot, and can melt/damage things you dont want to...

Even if the shack doesnt carry the kit anymore, a quick search online will lead you to a number of kits designed to teach how to solder, and you might even be able to make a neat gadget while learning.
1987 TC - RIP
Reply

Hurff Offline
Senior Member
#5
Its always funny when three other responses show up in the time it takes you to type yours.

I have to say, the folks here are among the most supportive of any board on which I regularly participate.... bar none.
1987 TC - RIP
Reply

Forcedbird Offline
Member
#6
Cool, thanks guys you have been very helpful. I am going to go to radio shack buy the kit and have some fun. I'll try to post some pics when I start practicing on old wires.

Thanks,
-Kashain
88 TC

HY 35, Ported Oval head w/OS valves, EEC Tuner, Bob's MOAL, .510 lift cam, Tial 38mm wastegate, K&N in fender, Kirban AFPR, Walbro 255lph fuel pump, 57 lb inj., GN intercooler, Gillis valve, Race eng. adjustable cam pulley, HKS SSQV BOV, Steeda Tri-ax shifter, 4" DP to 2 1/2" exhaust, no muffers, Timing set to 12* BTDC, 26 psi of boost. Needs to get tuned!

Proud to be a NATO member!
Reply

Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#7
I would personally stay away from the butane soldering iron, at least for a beginner. Much harder to control, and difficult to use if soldering a wire close to other wires without damaging the insulation on the nearby wires.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
Reply

Martin Offline
Senior Member
#8
Can't go wrong with the information that the Crew has posted so far! The type of connectors you took a picture of, as well as the standard "crimp type" conectors are bst used for an emergency repair only!!! If you use crimp connetors, you immediately derate the amperage capacity of the wire you are crimping by 10% or more, not to mention the corrsion that will eventually make the connection even more resistant. Not wise on our cars that had the wiring, at best, sized right to the load requirements.
There are a few web sites you can Google as well, some of the bigger companies that supply welders and welding materials have sections dedicated to soldering and soldering tips. Like Jeff mentioned, best way to learn this, is to get a god soldering gun, some "Wire solder", there are different kinds, so ensure its for wire, and pla with it. You will be making connections like the pros in no time!
Martin
Stock 87, no mods, Black with the grey interior.
Boost High, Fly Low
Reply

evintho Offline
Senior Member
#9
Here's a few tutorials on how to solder. Just like you mother always told you 'practice makes perfect'!

http://fordfuelinjection.com/?p=7
http://www.teamnovak.com/tech_info/how_to/solder/
http://www.poundofpain.com/howtosolder.html
Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding.
Proverbs 3:5

1986 Turbocoupe 5-spd - New daily driver!
1988 Turbocoupe 5-spd - parts car.
1989 Mustang convertible (Thunderstang). Built '88 TC shortblock, head by Boport, R/R, T3, Bobs log, gutted, rotated, ported mannys, AFPR, LA3, NPR I/C, etc.
Check out Thunderstang!
Reply

Matt S Offline
Posting Freak
#10
Hey Kashain!

I've wielded a soldering gun since I started taking things apart as a kid and I still think I can't solder. If your joint doesn't look perfect, it's better to leave it that way than try to clean it up unless you can cut the wire and start with fresh bare. You should also be prepared to melt lots of insulation; and don't forget to put the heat shrink tubing on VERY FAR AWAY from where you're soldering or it shrinks right there and you can't get it over the joint.

I can count on one hand the number of times I actually did a nice silvery solder where I can still see the wire twist and it's all purdy like the pictures. I have no idea how someone solders 10 gauge and thicker with only 1/2" exposed wire and not melting the insulation, for me the insulation always starts smoking before the wire melts the solder unless I take more than 1 inch insulation off, and I have a 240w gun!

You're going to make messy solders, just slip that shrink tubing up to hide it! And like Jeff said heat the wire, don't put solder on the gun and let it drain onto the wire, that cold joint may not hold, and could have worse resistance than a connector.

Sometimes I do use the connectors like in your post, they're not great but the piggy back one has served my o2 gauge fine for 3 years. I don't like the permanency of soldering in some situations. Now for my fans where lots of current is happening, I did solder, and I used a propane torch with metal flashing behind it to protect the area around it.

I drool over Joe's soldering he did to the ribbon on the instrument cluster. I would have melted the whole thing and caught the curtains on fire!!
Sold it Sad*
Reply





Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)



Theme © iAndrew 2018 - Software MyBB