North American Turbocoupe Organization



Clutch problem?
Daniel T Offline
Junior Member
#1
A few days ago I posted about a hard brake pedal, thanks to the help of some of u guys I got that figured out, well now today the car had a hard time to go into 1st gear, at a red light I put the car in 1st gear so when it change to green i wouldnt b having an issue with it, so it was in 1sr with the clutch all the way and the car started moving forward slowly, if this happened to any of u let me know wht it was please, in the meantime ill b doing some research.
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Rob H Offline
Member
#2
Just to be clear, are you saying you've been having problems shifting into first?
Also, when you say the car started moving forward slowly, is that despite you holding the car with the brakes?
If you were not braking, is it possible the car was rolling on an uneven surface?
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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#3
(06-11-2020, 12:26 AM)Daniel T Wrote: A few days ago I posted about a hard brake pedal, thanks to the help of some of u guys I got that figured out, well now today the car had a hard time to go into 1st gear, at a red light I put the car in 1st gear so when it change to green i wouldnt b having an issue with it, so it was in 1sr with the clutch all the way and the car started moving forward slowly, if this happened to any of u let me know wht it was please, in the meantime ill b doing some research.

Most unmodified TCs have a hydraulic clutch (Mustangs had a clutch cable). While this arrangement is remarkably reliable, after a time either or both the clutch master cylinder and the slave cylinder will wear out. You might never need a master cylinder, but I’ve been through several slave cylinders. The system works just like brakes, and it sounds like it’s not allowing the clutch to fully release.

If you get under the car and look on the left of the bellhousing (it’s between the transmission and the engine), you’ll see a black cylinder with a hose/tube coming from it on one end; on the other there is a shaft that fits into a lever sticking out of the bellhousing. That is the clutch release fork; it operates the release (throw out) bearing that moves the clutch plate in and out and engages or releases the clutch, allowing you to shift gears.

As the slave cylinder wears out it allows less and less movement—eventually you won’t be able to shift in and out of any gear.

Replacement is straightforward. There is a tiny roll pin that you’ll remove and replace with a new one in the kit  when you’re done that removes the supply hose. The cylinder should come right off. Upon installation DO NOT remove the plastic straps that hold the shaft in place, they are designed to break upon first application of the clutch pedal. You’ll need to bleed the clutch system—the how-to is described in the instructions that came with it (or ask and we can help you), and is generally pretty easy.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Daniel T Offline
Junior Member
#4
(06-11-2020, 10:59 AM)anasazi4st Wrote:
(06-11-2020, 12:26 AM)Daniel T Wrote: A few days ago I posted about a hard brake pedal, thanks to the help of some of u guys I got that figured out, well now today the car had a hard time to go into 1st gear, at a red light I put the car in 1st gear so when it change to green i wouldnt b having an issue with it, so it was in 1sr with the clutch all the way and the car started moving forward slowly, if this happened to any of u let me know wht it was please, in the meantime ill b doing some research.

Most unmodified TCs have a hydraulic clutch (Mustangs had a clutch cable). While this arrangement is remarkably reliable, after a time either or both the clutch master cylinder and the slave cylinder will wear out. You might never need a master cylinder, but I’ve been through several slave cylinders. The system works just like brakes, and it sounds like it’s not allowing the clutch to fully release.

If you get under the car and look on the left of the bellhousing (it’s between the transmission and the engine), you’ll see a black cylinder with a hose/tube coming from it on one end; on the other there is a shaft that fits into a lever sticking out of the bellhousing. That is the clutch release fork; it operates the release (throw out) bearing that moves the clutch plate in and out and engages or releases the clutch, allowing you to shift gears.

As the slave cylinder wears out it allows less and less movement—eventually you won’t be able to shift in and out of any gear.

Replacement is straightforward. There is a tiny roll pin that you’ll remove and replace with a new one in the kit  when you’re done that removes the supply hose. The cylinder should come right off. Upon installation DO NOT remove the plastic straps that hold the shaft in place, they are designed to break upon first application of the clutch pedal. You’ll need to bleed the clutch system—the how-to is described in the instructions that came with it (or ask and we can help you), and is generally pretty easy.
It sounds like thats the problem, well i hope, i went under the car and i took the cylinder off by hand nothing was holding it and the small rod was really loose.
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anasazi4st Offline
Senior Member
#5
(06-11-2020, 12:02 PM)Daniel T Wrote:
(06-11-2020, 10:59 AM)anasazi4st Wrote:
(06-11-2020, 12:26 AM)Daniel T Wrote: A few days ago I posted about a hard brake pedal, thanks to the help of some of u guys I got that figured out, well now today the car had a hard time to go into 1st gear, at a red light I put the car in 1st gear so when it change to green i wouldnt b having an issue with it, so it was in 1sr with the clutch all the way and the car started moving forward slowly, if this happened to any of u let me know wht it was please, in the meantime ill b doing some research.

Most unmodified TCs have a hydraulic clutch (Mustangs had a clutch cable). While this arrangement is remarkably reliable, after a time either or both the clutch master cylinder and the slave cylinder will wear out. You might never need a master cylinder, but I’ve been through several slave cylinders. The system works just like brakes, and it sounds like it’s not allowing the clutch to fully release.

If you get under the car and look on the left of the bellhousing (it’s between the transmission and the engine), you’ll see a black cylinder with a hose/tube coming from it on one end; on the other there is a shaft that fits into a lever sticking out of the bellhousing. That is the clutch release fork; it operates the release (throw out) bearing that moves the clutch plate in and out and engages or releases the clutch, allowing you to shift gears.

As the slave cylinder wears out it allows less and less movement—eventually you won’t be able to shift in and out of any gear.

Replacement is straightforward. There is a tiny roll pin that you’ll remove and replace with a new one in the kit  when you’re done that removes the supply hose. The cylinder should come right off. Upon installation DO NOT remove the plastic straps that hold the shaft in place, they are designed to break upon first application of the clutch pedal. You’ll need to bleed the clutch system—the how-to is described in the instructions that came with it (or ask and we can help you), and is generally pretty easy.
It sounds like thats the problem, well i hope, i went under the car and i took the cylinder off by hand nothing was holding it and the small rod was really loose.

When you put it back it is IMPERATIVE that you also include the small opaque plastic nipple on the end of the metal shaft. It might have broken remnants of the strap that was on there, but it doesn’t matter. The system REQUIRES that small piece of plastic for 2 reasons: as a spacer between the clutch fork and the shaft, and as a sort of buffer to help reduce vibrations from the fork assembly.

If you don’t reinstall it you’ll probably find that you can’t adequately shift gears, the clutch won’t fully disengage.

I made this mistake years ago, removed what looked like leftover junk to me. When I could not shift gears I was back under there after retrieving that small part from the trash and reinstalling it.
Another proud dues-paying member.

1987 Turbo Coupe w/T5OD, 8.8 axle, grey smoke; most options. Got it in 1991 with 41K miles: 3 turbos, 2 heater cores, 1 T5OD full rebuild, 5 clutches, 1 head gasket, 2 Teves II ABS units, etc. later....
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Daniel T Offline
Junior Member
#6
I got the sleve cylinder and i already put it on, I got my son to help me bleed the line and the car still doing the same, having trouble going in gears and coming out of them. So to bleed the line is like bleeding brakes? Maybe my son didnt do it right? Any sugestions?
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Daniel T Offline
Junior Member
#7
Master clutch cylinder maybe?? Im gonna order it and change it and hopefully it works.
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Kuch Offline
Senior Member
#8
It wouldn't hurt to change it as well.
1988 Turbo Coupe, Black/Black, 5 Speed, Moonroof,  T3/T4 50 trim, ported E6, 255LPH, BBK AFPR, 3" DP dual 2.5" w Hooker Maxflows, MGW shifter, K&N, Gillis valve, RR cam, Koni's
1964 Ford Galaxie 500XL, 390 6V, 4 Speed, Vast and fast
1960 Ford Starliner, 292 Y Block, 3 Speed, slow and low
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Daniel T Offline
Junior Member
#9
(06-16-2020, 01:17 PM)Kuch Wrote: It wouldn't hurt to change it as well.
Might as well..who know when was the last time that it was changed.
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fred k Offline
Senior Member
#10
(06-16-2020, 01:40 AM)Daniel T Wrote: Master clutch cylinder maybe?? Im gonna order it and change it and hopefully it works.
Not sure why the only subject is the hydraulic components.  If your pressure plate is fatigued and some of the fingers have failed it may not have the strength to pull the plate away from the clutch all the way.  Also, you may consider the clutch fork.  Definitely easier to eliminate the hydraulic components first.
fred l kennedy
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