North American Turbocoupe Organization



Cam bearing removal tool?
David85TC Offline
Member
#1
What tool will i need, to change my cam bearings?
1985 Turbo coupe 71,000 miles Medium Red Metallic with Gray cloth interior, all option except leather and passenger power seat. All stock. But unfortunatly she has bad rust.

1988 Turbo coupe 88,000 miles Sandalwood with base leather seats, all option except moonroof and passenger power seat. Bone stock.

1985 30th Anniversary T-bird.
Reply

Timmay Offline
Senior Member
#2
All i can say is check your local auto parts stores. See if they have a cam bearing tool to buy or rent. But easiest way is to just have a machine shop do it for ya usually doesnt cost a lot.
Oh and if your wondering wat a cam bearing tool looks like they normally look like this or close to this.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002SQZQ8/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000OUXAI0&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0W6H98FR5N 5H2J57YVT3
1988 Turbocoupe- RIP in a place without rust!
1978 Mercury Bobcat super clean-2.3T, t5 trans, 8.8 rear 3.73 gears 31 spline axles,255 walboro in-line,MBC,3 inch exhaust,4 wheel disc brakes,5 lug
Reply

junkedturbo Offline
Senior Member
#3
Sears charges $70 to $100 for the tool depending on what size your looking at, I've never seen one for rent.

As Timmay says best to have the machine shop do the work, they were going to charge me $30 but they also install and cut the bearings to the proper clearences with your cam.

Don't try to hammer them out yourself as you'll probly end up damaging an otherwise good cylinder head, cam bearings really aren't a DIY thing Sad
Reply

David85TC Offline
Member
#4
Yeah i would want to buy this tool.
It´s pretty expensive to let machine shop do it here in Iceland, it is about 120$
1985 Turbo coupe 71,000 miles Medium Red Metallic with Gray cloth interior, all option except leather and passenger power seat. All stock. But unfortunatly she has bad rust.

1988 Turbo coupe 88,000 miles Sandalwood with base leather seats, all option except moonroof and passenger power seat. Bone stock.

1985 30th Anniversary T-bird.
Reply

Timmay Offline
Senior Member
#5
man if i went to a machine shop and they told me 120 id have to walk out laughing
1988 Turbocoupe- RIP in a place without rust!
1978 Mercury Bobcat super clean-2.3T, t5 trans, 8.8 rear 3.73 gears 31 spline axles,255 walboro in-line,MBC,3 inch exhaust,4 wheel disc brakes,5 lug
Reply

David85TC Offline
Member
#6
Haha yeah, this sucks
1985 Turbo coupe 71,000 miles Medium Red Metallic with Gray cloth interior, all option except leather and passenger power seat. All stock. But unfortunatly she has bad rust.

1988 Turbo coupe 88,000 miles Sandalwood with base leather seats, all option except moonroof and passenger power seat. Bone stock.

1985 30th Anniversary T-bird.
Reply

junkedturbo Offline
Senior Member
#7
Why is it expensive up there :confused:

Does Iceland not have a local machine shop so they have ship it out or do they just not get that much work so they charge $$$$
Reply

David85TC Offline
Member
#8
This is such a small community there are only 300,000 people here and this is an island, so it has to be much more expensive here. And here also has all increased after the current rate has fall down.
1985 Turbo coupe 71,000 miles Medium Red Metallic with Gray cloth interior, all option except leather and passenger power seat. All stock. But unfortunatly she has bad rust.

1988 Turbo coupe 88,000 miles Sandalwood with base leather seats, all option except moonroof and passenger power seat. Bone stock.

1985 30th Anniversary T-bird.
Reply

Chuck W Offline
Posting Freak
#9
I've replaced cam bearings in 1/2 doz 2.3 heads with a tool I made. One of those times was with the engine still in the car.

It consists of 2 pieces of 1/4 flat with a 3/8" hole in the middle of each. On one of the plates, I welded a 3/4" tall piece of tubing just a bit larger than the cam bearing. On the other, I welded 2-3 sections (about 1/2" tall) of tubing in a circle just slightly smaller than the OD of the cam bearing.

Put one on each side of the cam tower and run a bolt/nut through it with the plates ono the outside, and the tubing sections towards the cam tower. Snug them up and verify the placement of the "press" side so as not to score the cam tower, and tighten the bolt/nut and press the cam bearing out of the tower into the receiver side.
Loosen bolt and remove tool and bearing.

To install the new bearing, line up the bearing in the proper orientation and lightly press into the tower by hand to hold it in place. Re***emble your tool around the tower with the flats now facing inwards, and tighten the bolt/nut to install the new bearing. Keeping watch to make sure you're pressing it in straight and even. Once it bottoms out on the tower, the bearing is installed.

You could obviously make several improvements to this idea, like a stepped rod for the presser side to help locate things better, and keep the tool centered on the bearing.

I've used the same cheap-*** tool I made from scrap materials in the shop so many times though and it works just fine.
83 TC Clone, 80 Cougar XR-7, 85 Volvo 244 Turbo, AND 88 Scorpio
Reply

jangus Offline
Senior Member
#10
I made something really similar to what Chuck W's talking about, including the stepped, reversible "presser". Took a few minutes on the lathe, but the sucker works like a charm, and no trips to the machine shop for cam bearing replacement.
88TC 5speed, 160,000+, ranger roller, Evergreen T3, cone filter, manual boost controller.
One parts car still waiting to be taken apart.
Waiting in the garage: SC throttle body, SC intercooler, graphic equalizer, among other things.
Reply





Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)



Theme © iAndrew 2018 - Software MyBB