North American Turbocoupe Organization



88 Turbo Coupe won't idle correctly when warm.
LimaTee Offline
Member
#1
I installed plugs, plug wires, new cap & rotor, then got the timing set on my white bird today.
No change in how it runs.
It starts right up when cold, & runs fine for a while.

Once warm the idle goes south. If it is shut off when warm, it starts again, but will not idle.
After feathering the throttle for a couple of minutes to keep it running it begins to level out a bit. It idles roughly but doesn't die immediately like when first started warm.
It still seems to run down the road ok when warm, but dies at stop lights.
Any ideas where to look now for the problem?

It does have an exhaust leak...could that effect it that much?
Ron
The one part that never gets fixed on my cars is the nut that holds the steering wheel
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squeeky Offline
Member
#2
can you check codes? maybe TPS setting and a base idle reset...
88 turbocoupe, gillis valve, k&n, short throw shifter,3" exhaust with magnaflows,Garrett(turbonetics) T3,AFPR,18lbs boost for now.....
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Scott Mabe Offline
Member
#3
Also, maybe a vacuum leak.
1987 Turbo Coupe
1988 Thunderbird parts car/ possibly street/strip car
1990 F-250HD 460ci
2001 Pontiac Montana (wife's ride)

-PLEASE FORGIVE TYPOS, I USE SWYPE ON MY PHONE-
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LimaTee Offline
Member
#4
I pulled the codes this morning & got a number 42 (oxygen sensor).
I didn't know that a faulty one of these could cause so many problems with idle etc, but it may explain why the plugs that I took out of it yesterday were so black.
Ron
The one part that never gets fixed on my cars is the nut that holds the steering wheel
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#5
42 does NOT mean a bad O2!!! 42 is a symptom code telling you the correctly functioning O2 has detected a rich condition that is outside the correction range of the long term fuel trim adaptives. Check fuel pressure to be sure it is in spec. Check FPR vac hose for smell of fuel or liquid gas indicating a blown / leaking diaphram.

Was the 42 a HARD code (koer test) or CM code?
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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LimaTee Offline
Member
#6
Wow Jeff, Thanks for explaining that one to me. The manual that came with my decoder simply said: "42= Exhaust Gas Oxygen Sensor: Voltage sensor always 'rich'(high value)-does not switch."
I talked to my brother this morning and he asked if my coolant temperature sender might be faulty because my temp. gauge has been crazy since I bought the car.
Do you agree that the coolant sender could cause the symptoms that I described above?
I bought both temperature sending units this morning to install, but will definitely check the fuel pressure and the FPR vac.hose (as soon as I figure out where it is located).
This was a KOEO test. I am not sure what a CM Code is.
Ron

The one part that never gets fixed on my cars is the nut that holds the steering wheel
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Dan S Offline
Administrator
#7
CONTINUOUS MEMORY CODES (CM)

Continuous Memory Codes are issued
as a result of information stored
while the vehicle was in normal operation
during the last 40 starts. These codes are
displayed after the separator code 10.
These codes should be used for diagnosis
only when Key On Engine Off and
Engine Running Self-Tests result in pass
or "ok" code 11.
Dan S
Custom 88 TC, Mandarin Copper Pearl Metallic
http://natomessageboard.com/ubbthreads.p...5#comments
1972 Ford F-100 SWB Styleside
2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 EcoBoost AWD
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#8
Personally, I never replace any part without a complete diagnosis of the problem. It is possible ECT is bad, but I would check it first. Kind of a PITA to get to, but pull the 2 pin connector off and get probes from an ohm meter onto the 2 terminals. Engine cold should read 20,000 ohms or more. Engine at operating temp should read in the low 1000's ohm range. You can also monitor the voltage across the ECT while the car is running and warming up. At operating temp, you should get about .4V across the ECT.
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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LimaTee Offline
Member
#9
DUH.......
I looked through the entire book that came with the scanner looking for a mention of CM Code. They never used that abbreviation, but talked about continuous memory a bunch. I just never made the connection...
Ron
The one part that never gets fixed on my cars is the nut that holds the steering wheel
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Pete D Offline
Administrator
#10
The temp sender for the gauge has nothing to do with the engine control module and vice versa Your temp gauge issue is a separate problem. If the temp gauge and the oil pressure and fuel level gauges go erratically, up and down together, the problem is a bad instrument voltage regulator (IVR) which is on the back side of the gauge pod
Pete Dunham


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