North American Turbocoupe Organization



134a conversion
mike65 Offline
Member
#1
I was reading someones topic in ref. to converting from r-12 to 134a and they stated that you must replace the drier or accumulator (dont remember which) is this true and why must the part be replaced?I,m getting ready to convert mine but was just going to use one of those kits that are available everywhere.Has anyone done the switch and if so eas it a pita or what?
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5.0SHO77 Offline
Member
#2
Usually it is the accumulator and hoses. Theres a liner inside the accumulator tank that degrades and fails with 134. When I did the 5.0L transplant I had the option to switch to 134A, but from what the A/C shops in the area said, R134A cools best with larger grille openings, and thats what my 88 TC didn't have. I have a mechanical 17" steel fan with a CHP clutch and it barely does the job on the street, course I live in 105+ climate during the summer. Once I am moving it is fine. I told them go ahead with R12 even though it is more expensive, it seems like the more you add the cooler it gets. With R134A, there is a certain point where you add more and the temp falls off. Systems BUILT for 134 seem to work great, and retrofits that can flow tons of air.

Jason
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Noname
Guest
#3
I've done conversions on quite a few cars. On all of them I fixed the leaks. Some got new driers (accumulators), some didn't. Some I replaced the oil, some I didn't. I never had any problems and it's been a few years for some of them. When you fix the leak you should replace all o-rings just to be safe. If the drier is ancient, replace it. Don't forget that whatever the capacity of freon originally was, you only put 85% of 134.

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Dave
'83TC
'85TC
'87TC
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fordprefect Offline
Member
#4
I did mine with the kit & the only PITA I had was connecting to low pressure valve. On my 88 it is on the passenger side firewall right next to the intercooler & since the car needs to be running while filling I had a hard time making the connection. But all I did was replace r-12 with the 134a & oil that came in the kit & it's working fine. The last 2 weeks have been 95 to 102 degrees with high humidity!

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'88 TC 5 speed 152k White/Red w/leather(air freshener)SmileK&N cone,
'74 VW Bug Black/Black Heat in the summer
& AC in Winter!
N.A.T.O. member
"I Love Deadlines, I Love the Whooshing Sound They Make As They Pass By"
'88 TC 5 speed 161k White/Red w/leather(air freshener:-)K&N cone,
'74 VW Bug Black/Black Heat in the summer & AC in Winter!
"I Love Deadlines, I Love the Whooshing Sound They Make As They Pass By" DNA
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Jeff K Offline
Administrator
#5
The desicant used in the accumulator/dryer on older cars, like TCs, will break down over time with 134a, and will travel thru the system plugging things like the orifice tube, up eventually. When you buy a new accumulator/dryer it will probably have a label that says "R12 & R134a compatable" on it. Personally, I prefer to do it right the first time, and just replace the acculum/dryer. Get this: WHen I recently converted my 91 Escort to 134a, I called the dealer to price a new accumulator, they quoted me $260! Got one at Advance Auto for $60!

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Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 20 psi, forced air intercooler, water injection, bypass valve, Ranger roller cam, subframes, etc., etc.. // 86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP nitrous, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.... // 91 Escort: Bone stock winter car // 00 Windstar (wifes vehicle)
Jeff Korn

88 Turbo Coupe: Intake and exhaust mods, T3 turbo at 24 psi, forced air IC, water injection, BPV, Ranger cam, subframes, etc., etc.
86 Tbird 5.0 (original owner): intake, exhaust, valvetrain mods, 100 HP N2O, ignition, gears, suspension, etc., etc.
05 Taurus SEL Duratec daily driver
04 Taurus Duratec (wifes car)
02 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
95 Taurus GL Vulcan winter beater
67 Honda 450 Super Sport - completely customized
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mike65 Offline
Member
#6
Thanks everyone for the replies in regards to the conversion,of course now that i plan to do it the temp drops up here in good ole upstate ny,but im sure the heat will return.
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whyty88tc Offline
Member
#7
I asked the same question on converting.
The R12 that was left in the system had just enough pressure to cause a hiss for 5 seconds prior to me putting the R134 in. I used the retrofit kit from a national chain (sounds like Wall-mart)…the first can went in just like the directions said. The second can went in real slow, the third slower yet. I found out the contents of the cans went down the side of the fender not into the A/C system. In my case I had to apply pressure to the Quick Disconnect fitting on the accumulator to ensure the R134 went into the system (the last two cans went in just fine with this technique). I just returned from a 2,200 mile round trip from VA to IL and back the day after the conversion and we were just about frozen out of the car during triple digit heat index.
Gary F
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